Collecting Masterpieces
Photo of rare-maya-vessel-marble-ulua-valley-olmeques-kukulan-fetaher-snake-galerie-golocnda-specialist-musuem-quality-atrcheology

 

Pre-Colombian America
RARE MAYAN VESSEL
Mexico ­/ Guatemala - Olmecs Maya (1200 BC - AD 1550)

Old collection of Alvaro Guillot Munoz, constituted after the war and remained in the family until recently

 

Object :
Nº 1841
Medium :
Stone
Dimensions :
Height: 10.5 cm (4.1”) – Width: 31.5 cm (12.4”) – Diameter: 20 cm (7.8”)

Very rare vessel in travertine marble, golden beige in colour with slightly reddish veins. The tenons were carved and engraved with great dexterity, depicting two feathered serpents with open mouths showing their fangs. These motifs are in relief and inspired by the emblematic hieroglyphics of Mayan culture. The exterior walls are adorned with a beautiful geometric design, symbolizing the serpent god “Kukulan”. Ancient patina with pearly reflections in some areas and traces of very ancient calcification. Traces of internal trepan and superficial microfissures due to age. This object was carved in one piece.

The stone sculpture of Ulua Valley is rare and seems to step outside of classic Mayan traditions that highlight links with Copan. Following the Olmec influence, the Mayas of Guatemala arrived in Ulua Valley. The Mayans of this region are also associated with coloured terracotta objects which differ from other sites. It seems that the Mayans of Ulua reworked original symbolism to develop their own unique religion. This valley was of economic importance, as it was the principal location for the production of cocoa throughout Mesoamerica. Obsidian, jade and Quetzal feathers came from the surrounding mountains. These travertine vessels of extremely unique style and material are recognizable and were used during religious ceremonies of grandeur.